Global Journeys with Jill Dutton

Loreto, Baja California Sur: Culture, history, marine life, small town coastal living, and chocolate clams with Jesus Ordoñez

August 08, 2023 Jill Dutton Season 1 Episode 6
Global Journeys with Jill Dutton
Loreto, Baja California Sur: Culture, history, marine life, small town coastal living, and chocolate clams with Jesus Ordoñez
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In this episode of Global Journeys with Jill Dutton, we dive deep into the vibrant tapestry of Loreto, Baja California Sur’s past and present, unveiling hidden gems, untold legends, and the undeniable allure that has drawn travelers to this coastal paradise for centuries.

Nestled along the pristine coastline of the Gulf of California, Loreto is a destination that seamlessly blends natural beauty, rich history, and authentic Mexican culture. This charming town exudes a laid-back and inviting atmosphere that instantly captivates visitors. 

Loreto boasts a breathtaking backdrop of turquoise waters, stunning beaches, and rugged mountains. The Gulf of California, referred to as the "Aquarium of the World" by Jacques Cousteau, is renowned for its incredible marine diversity. Snorkeling, scuba diving, kayaking, and sport fishing are just a few of the activities that allow travelers to connect with the area's marine wonders.


For the traveler wishing to avoid touristy destinations and instead immerse themselves in local culture, Loreto offers a welcome escape from the hustle and bustle of modern life. 

Today’s guest is Jesus Ordoñez, the general director of Visit Baja California Sur promoting travel to this rich and varied destination comprising the southern half of the Baja Peninsula. An avid traveler and adventurer who loves scuba diving, sports fishing, hiking, road trips, tennis, and golf Jesus enjoys sharing his wealth of knowledge of, and passion for, the history, natural bounty, and vibrant community of Baja California Sur.


RESOURCES

Visit Baja California Sur 

Loreto BCS Tourism

Jill's article about visiting La Purisima: All in the Familia: Finding Authentic Mexican Cuisine, Made with Love in a Desert Oasis – Global Journeys with Jill Dutton

Loreto itinerary: Get Off the Beaten Path for an Authentic Baja California Sur Experience in La Purísima and Loreto — 6-Day Itinerary – Global Journeys with Jill Dutton

More articles about Loreto: Loreto, BCS – Global Journeys with Jill Dutton

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Speaker 1:

Welcome to Global Journeys with Jill Dutton, the captivating travel podcast that takes you on an extraordinary adventure around the world. I'm your host, jill Dutton, and I am thrilled to be your guide through the mesmerizing tapestry of cultures, landscapes and experiences that await us. Global Journeys with Jill Dutton is more than just a travel podcast. It's an exploration of humanity itself. Through the power of storytelling, we illuminate the lives of the remarkable individuals we encounter along the way, whether it's through the eyes of a fishing guide, a distillery owner, a mixologist, a historian, chef, or even a farmer. Each person we meet adds a rich layer to the narrative of culture and place. In this podcast, we embark on a transformative journey where the focus goes beyond the typical tourist attractions. Instead, we dive deep into the hearts and souls of the places we visit, uncovering the hidden gems and untold stories that make each destination truly unique. Join me as we venture off the beaten path, seeking authenticity, connection and a deeper understanding of the world we inhabit. Together, we'll unravel the tapestry of cultures, one story at a time. Although my writing career began in the late 90s, when I created and launched a wellness publication called Evolving Magazine, since 2015 I've worked as a travel writer on a mission to seek out the locally celebrated foods, liquor trends, outdoor activities and stories of those I meet along the way. My work has been published in Wine Enthusiast, a far woman's world, first for women, insider road trippers, modern farmer chilled magazine and many more digital and print publications. I'm also the creator of Global Plates the people we meet, the food they eat a syndicated column. Creating this podcast is the next step in my journey of sharing the stories of the people I've met along the way. So pack your curiosity, leave your preconceived notions behind and let's embark on Global Journeys with Jill Dutton, where each episode promises to inspire, educate and awaken the wanderlust within us all. In today's episode of Global Journeys with Jill Dutton, we'll dive deep into the vibrant tapestry of Laredo's past and present, unveiling hidden gems, untold legends and the undeniable allure that has drawn travelers to this coastal paradise for centuries. Nestled along the pristine coastline of the Gulf of California, laredo is a destination that seamlessly blends natural beauty, rich history and authentic Mexican culture. This charming town exudes a laid-back and inviting atmosphere that instantly captivates visitors. Laredo boasts a breathtaking backdrop of turquoise waters, stunning beaches and rugged mountains. The Gulf of California, referred to as the Aquarium of the World by Jacques Cousteau is renowned for its incredible marine diversity. Snorkeling, scuba diving, kayaking and sport fishing are just a few of the activities that allow travelers to connect with the area's marine wonders. Culturally, laredo offers a blend of Mexican traditions and local influences. Visitors can immerse themselves in the warm hospitality of the local community, savoring traditional Mexican cuisine and enjoying vibrant festivals that celebrate the town's heritage. Artisans often showcase their handcrafted goods, allowing travelers to take home a piece of Laredo's culture. For the traveler wishing to avoid the touristy destinations and instead immerse themselves in local culture, laredo offers a welcome escape from the hustle and bustle of modern life. I myself have visited Baja California Sur twice. The first time, an invitation to spend three days sport fishing Each day. We spent the day with a delightful captain as our guide, watched marine life and fished for our dinners. After a local restaurant would prepare our days' catch in a myriad of dishes such as ceviche, grilled, fried and more. It was a feast and the experience led to my interest in sport fishing. On my second visit, I flew into Laredo on one of American Airlines' direct flights. Mine was from Dallas, fort Worth. We toured the walkable city by foot, dining in small outdoor cafes, spent a day on a catamaran, discovering the islands in the south part of Laredo Bay, took a day trip to San Javier, then spent an overnight in a cabana in the middle of the desert, where we met a vibrant couple who shared their piece of paradise, set in a desert oasis, with us. For more information about La Parísima, see the link to an article I wrote about this delightful couple we met in the desert, or view the itinerary from the Laredo trip in this episode's notes or at globaljourneyswithjillduttoncom. Today's guest is Jesus Ordonez, the general director of Visit Baja California Sur, promoting travel to this rich and very destination comprising the southern half of the Baja Peninsula. Jesus is responsible for the development and execution of all destination marketing, public relations and team management. Since 2015, he has implemented a strategy focused on establishing destination ambassadors who encourage US and Canadian travelers to explore the many sites, trains and adventures of Baja California Sur. As an avid adventurer who loves scuba diving, sports, fishing, hiking, road trips, tennis and golf, jesus enjoys sharing his wealth of knowledge of, and passion for, the history, natural bounty and vibrant community of Baja California Sur. So, without further ado, please join me in welcoming Jesus to global journeys with Jill Dutton. Jesus, thank you for joining us today and sharing your insights on Laredo. We can't wait to embark on this incredible journey with you.

Speaker 2:

Oh, I'm very happy to be here with you today.

Speaker 1:

Oh wonderful, I'm going to ask you some quick questions that you can respond to just briefly. It's a look at Laredo in particular, to give listeners just a quick overview of the destination. So if you're ready, then the first question is what is Laredo known for?

Speaker 2:

All right. Well, loreto is a let's see, it's a small destination in the Gulf of California, coast of Mexico, on the state of Baja California Sur, and this destination has two very important features. One of them is it's a Pueblo Magico, which is a destination granted by the federal Mexican government to all these, all of these locations that preserve their culture, heritage, their architecture and that are significant within the development of a community, and this because Loreto was the first capital of the California. What this means is that when the Spaniards came into mainland Mexico, they heard of a place that was reached with pearls. They, at the time there was a very famous novel, las Nergas de Splandian, which are the adventures of Splandian, and that novel talked about an island reigned by a queen, queen, calafia. The island was named California, and this island was reached with gold and pearls. So when they heard about this place, they gave it a try and landed in what is now La Paz in 1532, and it took a more than 150 years to be able to to leave a settlement that will stay for the long run, and this was Loreto in 1697. So the first mission settlement was Our Lady of Loreto, and from there they, the Spaniards, started, started exploring all the way south to what is now Los Cabos, and they were settling missions on the way and also, at the same time, they were moving north. So they settled a number of missions until they got all the way up to San Francisco, california, now the US California. So when they they thought this was an island and it was certainly reached with pearls and gold, so they decided to name it California. So Loreto was the first capital of this area and as the as the missionaries kept going north, they realized it was not an island but a peninsula. So of the original maps, it will portray this region as an island, the island of California. Yeah, as you can see, this place marks a very iconic moment in history and and and now it conveys the two countries, the US and Mexico. Because the missionaries then, as they realized this was a peninsula, they called the part where the uh well, the peninsula. Actually they called it Baja California and the mainland, what is now in the US, they called it Alta California. Alta means higher or upper, upper California, and Baja means lower. So when that part of land became the US, the US got rid of Upper California and Mexico. We never changed the name and we kept the Baja or lower California. So, yeah, it is interesting. So many people would realize that the California mining and heritage, it all and branches, actually it all started here and went all the way up north. So there is a lot of tradition, a lot of heritage, a lot of history that unites these two regions. So it was one region and it developed from the same background. So what Loreto means with regards to the rich cultural heritage, but not only that, gilles, I would like to add to this rich cultural heritage the fact that near Loreto you can also see some of the oldest gate paintings in America, so where you will see the vision of the first settlements, that Gochimi tribes that lived in the region and they painted on the caves they lived, they were semi-nomads and you can see still today a lot of the life of the animals that they painted. They are still there in the region, like the whales, like the vouchers, like the deer, like the longhorn cheeps and many of these things that they painted. You can still go back and see the cave paintings that are exposed to the elements the rain, the sun, the wind and you can still see them very clearly. So it talks about a blending of a culture that will still persist in the region, and the visitors that will come to visit us will find that they will see how the locals live. This is still a very small community of less than 20,000 inhabitants. Everybody knows each other and everybody has lived there for a long time, so they are very welcoming, very warm, very happy people. They want to preserve their heritage, they want to preserve their culture and they want travelers that have an experience of exploration and an open mind to to learn how life is possible between a desert, a Sierra range and the sea. So it's a very particular way of living because there are very scared resources like water, and there are very few places where you can grow vegetables and and find a living. So still today, a small community because it cannot grow, grow big because, again, you have limitations. You have limitations on your resources. So what I'm trying to say is that many people will not consider this part of Mexico as rich culturally as if you talk about the Maya Peninsula or the or the Mexico City temples of the previous spanish people. Fortián, sforia and specifically Loretto will be a great place for those that like to do an historic immersion on this region of Mexico. So that's one of the things that I will say describe the region. So you can still see the first mission that was built there. There's some museum next to it, so you really get a clear picture of what it was.

Speaker 1:

And can visitors, can tourists? Can they visit the caves or like on a guided tour, or is that an option?

Speaker 2:

Yes, visitors have to visit the caves with guided tours because these places are in the heart of the Sierra de la Giganta. So, if not something, you can take your car or your bike or take a hike and get there. By no means we will never recommend that, but you can take a guided tour and you will really enjoy this scenery. You will really take I mean you need to go out there with a good space and your memory of your phone or your camera, because you will take a lot of pictures. And yeah, but we will strongly recommend to do a guided tour with a serious, established company that will do that.

Speaker 1:

Okay, and as far as yourself personally, I know you like to scuba dive and that you're an angler. You're a fisherman. What do you consider like a perfect day in Laredo? What would you be doing?

Speaker 2:

Question I had. The second point was precisely what you are going to. Then we have the Gulf of California, which is it was named as by Jaco Stor, the famous French explorer and biologist. He called these waters the living aquarium of the world, and the reason this is because this is the youngest body of water in the world. So the reach by adversity within these waters is just amazing. Yeah, I'm a diver and I really really enjoy diving in the waters of Laredo because of the very. You see a lot of different species within one dive and many, many fishes of each species, so it's just breathtaking. And so, going back to your second question is right now, summertime, most of the activities you do are within the water, so either you go fishing or diving. It might be a little bit hot depending where you live. For instance, if you live in or someone listening to us is living in Arizona, I'm going to say Phoenix it's hotter in Phoenix than what it is in Laredo, not by much, but then you have the advantage of having the water, the freshwater, so you really get your temperature leveled and enjoy the experience. So sport fishing is great. We have maji maji right now, we call it dorado, and the Jurel will soon be coming up to the chores some marling, but we also have some sea bass, big sea bass too. So I've been seeing the fishing reports and they've been cutting good size maji, maji and dolphin fish. So it is exciting time to be fishing here in Baja Today. Just so you know, there is a very important fishing tournament taking place as we speak, which is the Escape, a Beesbee tournament with $1.8 million in prices, and this is the first tournament of the year that will end up with the bigger black and blue Beesbee in November in Los Cabos that last year the winner took home $3.8 million. So it's one of the largest fishing in the world and Baja California is very well known for its sport fishing and staying with that. The beauty of Laredo is that you have different options of fishing near and around Laredo, because if you want to go on the Pacific side, you can go. It's about a two hour drive to get there, so you can still make it in the morning. Get to the Pacific side on Magdalena Bay, go out there and fish, whether it's fly fishing or casting or open water fishing. You can do it all on both sides on the Pacific and the Gulf of California and the same for diving. So most of the diving, though, is actually done within the Gulf of California because of the islands, the sea lion colonies, and we run into mollusks and dolphins, and so it's always something to see there and it's just magnificent.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and with what you said about the sea lions, is there a particular time of year that's best for whale watching and another time that's best for the sea lions, marine life, certain times a year when they're the guys?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, actually the sea lions are not there right now because they move to a specific point near La Paz to mate. So they are now on their mating season. So they come down to the largest colony of sea lions, which is near around La Paz, and then they go back as soon as the newborns arrive, then the males start going back to Loreto. So the sea lions will be back in Loreto, let's say by the end of the month. But then the whale season we have mainly the blue whale is the one that comes to Loreto and that's the biggest mammal in the world. It's very shy. Very little risk on the world has been done on this species, still under protection by the federal government of Mexico and also in the world is a protected species. So we're very honored to receive the blue whale every year from December to April. Since they go around the peninsula from Alaska, they arrive a little later than the other whales arrived and the other whale sanctuary is in Baja California. So on the Pacific coast we have the great whales and then on the Gulf we have the blue whale. So from Loreto you can visit both the blue whales and the great whales on the same trip, so you will get to by a Magdalena, spend the day there and take two turns and going out to see the whales within the bay and then drive back to Loreto. Or you can say another day and do the same and then come back on the afternoon to Loreto and take at least two turns in Loreto in two different days. So it usually looks like getting up in the morning around eight by by age, or out on the boat. It will take you about an hour boat ride to get to the spot. It's a very specific area where all the boats can go to to meet with the whales, because that area is the designated protected area where the viewing could be done on the most secure and safe matter for both the species and as the visitors. Another important thing to mention, Jill, is that this activity should also be done with with qualified operators, because there is just a number of boats that have the credentials to take people out to see the whales, because they have complied with all of the necessary requirements on training and knowledge about the species to do this type of viewing, and so it's very important to outline this because this is for protection of both the species and our visitors. So you are out there looking. You know they. You don't see them from close, but you see them from far. But it's incredible all of the knowledge that the captains will share with you, because they've been doing this activity for many years and they have developed this, this relationship with the species, because they know them whales, by name. They know each individual. They can identify them because of the shape of their tail, because of the marks on their skin, and they can tell you how many times that whale has been on the Loreto Marine National Park, how many baby whales had that female have and what are their names, and so on and so forth. So you will learn about their behavior. You will learn about why they come here to breed and give birth and feed and while they don't feed, they feed once they go back to Alaska. But it is, it is a very important part of their life to make it back to the safe waters of the Gulf of California. So we're very fortunate and also very excited and happy to share with with all of your audience, and this is a mass-due experience in your life. This is just a very unique and fulfilling experience and it's amazing. So I highly recommend that, because when the whales are here, where the sea lions are. Here you will see other marine life on the marine national park. This is the we believe is the second largest marine national park in Mexico, so there's a lot of things to see from birds like the blue-footed boobies that live there permanently. Too many people will never expect to run into them there, but they do. So you see a lot of life both in on the water, on top of the water, and on the air. So the whale watching experience we recommend to do two times to go out in to Loreto to see two days in a row, or two separate days to see the whales, because each day is different and again you are looking at a species on its natural habitat and you can never tell what's going to happen. So fantastic, so it's it's our recommendation. So to do well watching, we will recommend, highly recommend, to do a six to seven day trip because you will have to, because the weather is so nice. You can do a mix of two days while watching Loreto for the blue whales. Then you can go to Bahia Magdalena and do another two days there. You come back to Loreto and do some kay painting, some hiking. It's great to do hiking at a time of the year, you can visit a ranch where you can also learn how the locals may make their flour tortillas with the cheese. They prepare the cheese and they will teach you how to do the burritos so that is just wonderful, because you can really see how the life of these small ranches in the middle of nowhere yes.

Speaker 1:

I visited La Parísima, the Cabanes at La Parísima exactly and we did. We. We ate her goat cheese and the homemade tortillas at every meal, and everything was sourced either from her land or from the ocean, 10 miles away. It was correct. It was the most amazing experience I've ever had. It really was the best food. And speaking of food, so food plays a significant role in the cultural experience of a destination. So what are some traditional dishes, since we're talking about that, or maybe even restaurants that visitors should try in Loreto?

Speaker 2:

well, great question and I agree with you food is a great. It's a very important part of the experience and, and I agree, when you go with Lili and Lalo over there, yes, it's incredible and they are such loving people, it feels I we always say that Lili is our grandma yes, you follow her.

Speaker 1:

She wanted to adopt me and I love, I love, I love them both. I did. It was a great visit. So is there a particular food that you think someone to try, or you know if someone wants a traditional dish in in Loreto? What do you suggest?

Speaker 2:

yeah, thank you for that question. Well, I will suggest a few things. One of them is almejas, which are the clams, and the case Loreto is famous for the almejas chocolate. It's the same as chocolate, but instead of an E you add an, a chocolate because of the color of the outer shell, and in Loreto they have different ways of preparing this almeja that. But I'll tell you why this, this dish, is important. It's documented that the cochimi, the original, uh, semi nomads habitants of this land, will come to the seashore and will pick the clams on low tide and they will prepare necklaces to dry the clams and put them on the necklace so that when they go back to the, when they will move to a different spot, if they didn't hunt or they were lacking protein, they would each one of these clams to feed the children and the elder. So there is an Asian tradition of these food being part of the local diet still today. So local Loretanos eat a lot of almejas, and they have. They are delicious and they have several dishes. The one, the most typical one, is called almeja tatemada, which is a smoked almeja that they place on the ground, facing backwards, so they place it on the ground, on the gravel bed they make and then they bring. They collect this dry bush from the desert and put it on top of the almeja. They light it up so the heat of the bush will cook the almeja, and then you let it dry a little bit, bring, you grab a slate of on the arroyo on the creek and then you heat the lower bottom of the almeja and the slate and it opens up. So you put several of these on one flour tortilla and they prepare a dip made of mustard. So you use a spoon of this dip and you do a burrito with it and it's just delicious. The nice thing about it, jill, is that every Saturday at one of the local hotels they prepare this dish every Saturday. So you have the opportunity that during Saturdays try it out first hand the old fashioned way they used to do it. So almeja satemada is a must do in Loreto and they also almejas en escabeche, which is a traditional way of preparing food the old way, before refrigerators were a very common thing on our kitchen, so they had to preserve food for longer periods of time. So that's one way they did it. Escabeche of almejas, so it's vegetables and it has this special sauce they prepare for it, or deep, and you eat it with crackers or with chips or tostadas. So that's another must do in Loreto.

Speaker 1:

Oh, that sounds wonderful. During my visit we dined at an outdoor restaurant with live music and I noticed that there were both tourists and locals at the venue. Is this common in Loreto? Is it part of the charm of that city? Because it seemed that it was more tourist friendly than touristy. But it was nice that everyone was coming together and I'm curious on your thoughts.

Speaker 2:

That's one of the identities of Loreto. Yeah, I agree with you, it's very common. There is a community of expats living there, both Canadians and Americans. They blend in and that's great that you asked me this, because people visiting Loreto to expect to blend in with the locals because you will do everything they do, you will be with them at all times, because that's their small town and they you know you. It's not like a separate area for tourists and a separate area for the locals. They get together everywhere, were you at the plaza or on that restaurant.

Speaker 1:

Yes, and I believe we were having pizza and there was live music. It was just delightful. You know, it was a nice evening and we sat outside.

Speaker 2:

Correct, exactly. So that's the ambiance of Loreto it's open, it's friendly, it's joyful, but still very tranquil, very safe, very, as you remember, everything is walking distance. Yes, you don't need a car at all, and that's the nice thing about it that the local hotels are owned and operated by their owners. So they become, they become your host and they will tell you go here because they have this dish today and try it out, or this bar or this restaurant is having live music, go over there and have a drink and enjoy, or go over here to have a coffee, or so they will be guiding you around, and so it's a very friendly, easy to move around, family oriented couple, you name it. So, yeah, loreto is the whole town, becomes your resort, so to speak, because these hotels that are, you know, the smaller hotels have four rooms and the average sites of hotels are from 12 to 15 rooms. So some of these hotels don't have a restaurant. But then there are like 10 restaurants around town that you can get to walking distance, so you can go to different restaurants every day. We have traditional Mexican food, like mole, like other dishes that are more of mainland Mexico, and then we have the traditional seafood restaurant, casa Carmen, that they prepare all of their food with mesquite grill, which tastes really, really good. So you have a place where I'll places to choose from from that place that you mentioned where you can have a beer and a pizza, or you can go and have a more fine dining experience just across the street, across the plaza where you were at. So you do have many, many choices.

Speaker 1:

It was. It was absolutely delicious, everything that we tried lots of seafood and you know Mexican dishes. It was just. It was amazing. And unfortunately I'm running out of time, so are there any other topics that we didn't get to that you'd like to discuss, or do you feel like as an insider? Do you want to make any recommendations for must do activities or you know tips for anyone visiting? I'm going to leave it up to you how you want to spend the last couple minutes.

Speaker 2:

All right, well, thank you. Yes, I do want to add that we have great connectivity with the US. We have direct flights from Los Angeles, from Phoenix, from Dallas, fort Worth, year round, and we also have seasonal flights from Calgary, canada, and San Francisco. These are on the winter. The only time that the Dallas flight stops is right now, from August and September, but then after that, every Saturday, you can connect to Loretto. So if you're on, if you are, or your, your listeners are on the East Coast, they can connect to Dallas easily or even Phoenix. And if you are on the West Coast, well, there's no excuse. You have Los Angeles and then Phoenix and San Francisco on the winter.

Speaker 1:

Yes, and even like myself, I'm in Kansas right now, smack dab in the middle, but I just flew into Dallas and I was there, so it was very quick and easy.

Speaker 2:

Exactly so. It's very easy. And there is also another option for people living on the Southern California area, which is the cross, using the cross border Express, which is a bridge that connects you from San Diego or time is, and you land directly on the Tijuana airport. So that's the only place in the world that someone could do that go from one, you park your car on the US, you enter a facility where you document your luggage, go across the bridge and land on another country airport, and then the flyers or travelers could choose from two options Voladis, which is the largest low cost carrier in Mexico, and or a regional carrier called Calafia Airlines. So they have a small, all-embrider flying from Tijuana to Loreto, or you have a larger carrier with Voladis. So many Americans are using that because they find it very easy, very convenient, very cost effective, so that's their option. So, having said that, many things to do in Loreto, but the most important message that I would like to leave for your audience is that this is a destination Looking for travelers with an open mind, not those that are looking for known brands we don't have anything against them, but we don't have them in Loreto. So those that are willing to learn how the locals have their coffee, which is a very unique way of making it very old fashioned way, and being able to experience or try some food that you have never heard of and be a little bit adventurous on that way, you will find Loreto a really nice place to come. Very crowded, as you know, not many people. We don't have many rooms, we don't have many. I mean, it's not a very small destination. That's what I'm trying to say. So we highly recommend to take time to make your reservations booked ahead of time. We get sold out and we want to keep it that way. The locals want to keep it that way. They don't want to change their heritage. They want people to come to get to know that heritage. They want to share it. So this will be a very deep immersion on a very different part of Mexico. Very well-completed, very safe, good food and pristine natural surroundings, both an accommodation, as you remember, a combination of the desert, the colors of the desert, then the Burcois water of the sea, the blue depths, and then the Sierra range right behind the Sierra de la Laguna, where you see the sunset and the different colors of orange, red, pink and purple, and it's just so pretty on the backdrop of the Oasis, because Loreto is actually an Oasis. There are so many palm trees and you realize that when you go out to the islands and you're coming back you see how green it looks. So it's a very unique spot. So we are very happy to be reaching out through you to an audience that will be sensitive to these types of experiences, and we will be very happy to greet them in our end of the woods.

Speaker 1:

Perfect. So this was so wonderful and so interesting and I really appreciate your look into life in Baja, basically, and Loreto, as well as the destination. So thank you so much for your time and I hope to have you back, because I still have more questions that I'd love to discuss sometime. Wonderful. Well, thank you so much and I hope you enjoy the rest of your day. You, too, have a great one. Thank you. As we travel on this exciting podcasting journey together, I invite you, our incredible audience, to be a part of it. Share your own travel stories, insights and recommendations with us, whether you have a hidden gem in your hometown or a dream destination that has captured your imagination. We want to hear from you. Your suggestions will help shape the future episodes of Global Journeys with Jill Dutton, guiding us towards extraordinary locations and experiences that deserve a spotlight. Remember, this podcast is not about just the host or the guests. It's about the collective exploration and discovery that unites us all as wanderers in this vast world. So reach out to us through our website, social media channels or email and let your voice be heard. Send your suggestions to me at Jill at Global Journeys with JillDuttoncom. I can't wait to hear from you Until next time, may your travels be filled with endless curiosity, open-hearted encounters and transformative adventures. Safe travels, fellow explorers, and keep wandering.

Intro to Loreto and Jesus Ordoñez
Exploring Loreto's History and Cultural Heritage
Outdoor Activities and Wildlife in Loreto
Traditional Dishes and Local Loreto Ambiance